You are the Rock that I want…

Vai alla versione italiana >

11794341_10155880497655099_2890941434049826815_o

12232916_10156218330960099_7930974065649493654_o

Sunset after climbing in Peak District, November 2015

When I meet climbers in and from other Countries, there is one stable phrase that opens up the conversation, together with a look of compassion: “Oh, you live in England…there isn’t much to climb there, is it?”

Seen that I learned to climb and fell in love with this sport right here in England, I feel the need of spending some words to explain why this is absolutely not true.

11792089_10155880526200099_8691263917511847058_o

Wye Valley, August 2015

Even though we don’t have the Alps, the Sierra Nevada or the Grand Canyon, Great Britain offers a wide selection of rocks to climb, from bouldering to trad climbing, and also ice climbing during the cold Scottish winters.

Now I can see you ready to say: “Yes, but the weather is shit, it rains all the times! So even though you have rocks you can’t go climbing…” and it’s on this point, my dears, that you are wrong. It’s true that the weather is variable and that it could be sunny one day and rain cats and dogs the day after, but if you learn the right technique you will be sorted: Metoffice and the BBC will be your best friends during the week before the trip and the Thursday afternoon forecast is the final one, make it or break it. Luckily most of the hostels near the crags understand how difficult it is to deal with British weather and allow you to cancel or change booking until the day before the check-in.

11201121_10205659451662345_1745409141795908946_o

Me and Anna in Wales, April 2015

If you travel from abroad and you get a plane, then I understand that it might be hard to change plans at the last minute… The Solution? Choose Wales. In the valley around Llanberis the weather can change from one side to the other of the river/lake, so if it rains on one side you will just need to move on the other side to find perfect climbing conditions. I know it sounds incredible, but trust me, I’ve seen it with my own eyes!!!

10391383_10203895317080083_4980942015203819072_n

Trad Climbing in Peak District, July 2014

Last year I and the crew started traveling around the UK on mid-February (only for hardcore people who can stand belaying in the cold!!!) and we only stopped at the end of October. Never had major problems and actually, we have been very lucky as on the 3rd of April in Wales the weather was so warm that we climbed in a t-shirt…

If you chose Wales and you are so unlucky that it’s actually pouring down then the best you can do is to get ready for the adventure trail called Snakes and Ladders (I will write a post about it later on, but in the meantime you can check out Anna’s one here!), that will bring you to explore the soul of an old slate quarry.

Said all of the above, I decided to create a short list of places I’ve been climbing in the UK and that I think would be worth it a trip for foreigner climbers!

– Peak District.

12238128_10156216900685099_989868135305130108_o

Bouldering in Peak District, November 2015

Hard Sandstone. Trad Climbing, Bouldering. (A  bit of sport climbing but not much)

The Heaven for trad climbers and boulderers. There are various points of climbing, the routes are not super long (40/50 meters rope) and it’s a good place to train trad climbing…Just don’t forget cams!!!

Climbing here can be quite scary (based on my experience and the one of some more expert climbers) but for sure it’ll help on learning how to control your mind 😉

Peak District is also one of the most popular places for bouldering and every weekend is packed of strong climbers training in every weather conditions (even with snow!). In summer though the place is full of midges, so it’s better to avoid it if it’s not windy (personal experience one more time!)! It’s better to move around by car.

– Lake District, Keswick.

11069925_10205328217101688_5058437316662609565_n

The Bowderstone

Vulcanic Rock. Trad climbing, bouldering.

A lovely scenario, little towns that look like the perfect location for fairy tales. The routes are mostly trad and multipitch, so you need to be enough expert to know how to set up an anchor. I suggest a rope of 50/60meter.

Less common but anyway pleasant is the bouldering in the area… If you decide for bouldering you absolutely have to visit the Bowderstone in Keswick. Better to move around by car but there are a lot of buses you can take as well. Just be careful not to miss the last bus!

– Harrison’s Rock, Tunbridge Wells, Kent.

10636907_10155440190740099_1312899950093121920_o.jpg

Top Rope in Harrison’s Rock, March 2015

Soft Sandstone. Top Rope and bouldering.

One hour of train from London and you have a whole crag to train hard as the rock is so soft that requires strength and technique… Forget nice hand holds!!!

The routes are quite short, a rope of 30 meters will be enough but you need some extra gear to set up the top rope: because the rock is really soft it’s necessary to use a static rope for the anchor on top and make sure that the carabiner will not touch the rock directly. This is to avoid friction and the damage of rock and rope. Be extra careful!!!

Extra tip: the rock dries really slowly so to climb properly you need to make sure it doesn’t rain at last for 3 days before your climbing day. You can reach Eridge by train (the best toilets ever!!! Go and see them, they are on the opposite platform of the one you arrive on!) and then you walk for 20 minutes.

– Snowdonia, Galles.

11187183_10205659432741872_2320209271400871726_o.jpg

The view after a multipitch in Wales in April 2015

There are 8 different types of rock, all of them within 20/30 minutes one from the other. Bouldering, trad climbing, sport climbing.

As already mentioned the weather is quite variable, so you can find climbing spots even if the weather is not the best. It’s a very good place to start with trad climbing and mountaineering. Anna and I had the chance of climbing for the first time a very long route (150 meters!!!) and practice setting up anchors (Obviously with the help of an expert!). Rope: 50/60 meters.

As a gem in the desert there is the slate quarry I mentioned before, one of the main attraction for climbers in Wales. The rock is very sharp for shoes (I had to say goodbye to my beloved Katana… Sigh 😦 ), it’s just sport climbing and it’s amazing to climb. Having a car here is pretty much a must!

– Swanage, Portland.

10568786_292950680913645_3525489795245112186_n

Sport climbing in Swanage, August 2014

Limestone. Sport Climbing.

Favourite destination for London’s climbers from middle Aprile til the end of August, it’s on the sea and offers a wide range of sport climbing routes. Being near the sea, the rock wears out really quickly and the easiest routes are quite polished and slippery to climb. My suggestion is not to let this pull you down but try something slightly harder that will be for sure less polished. You need a car. 50 meters rope.

– Cheddar Gorge.

11077_10205232592871142_4740912968793394073_n.jpg

Coronation Street. Cheddar Gorge, March 2015

Limestone. Sport Climbing, Trad Climbing

Cheddar Gorge has been the place where I had my first leading experience in sport climbing!!! 50/60 meters.

Also here there is a wide selection of routes for sport climbing, but there are also routes for trad. There is one in particular that is really famous, the dream of every trad climbers: Coronation Street.

The walls run all along the main road and climbing is not allowed sometimes, so before organising your trip check here! If you decide for Cheddar Gorge go with an insurance that covers climbing or you will risk to get a ticket for that. Oh, and try the Cheddar!!! Car Needed.

– Wye Valley.

vale (2)

Vertigo. Wye Valley, August 2014

Limestone. Trad Climbing.

So, this place will remain in my heart for the rest of my life as I did my first trad leading. And right after that my first S: Vertigo.

The place is wonderful, the rock is absolutely fantastic (even though a bit polished for some of the more popular routes) and the river sound is highly relaxing. There are routes for beginners where you can learn to set up anchors with calm and no panic. 50/60 meters rope.

Some routes are easy but spectacular and when you reach the top you feel that all the effort to climb was worth the view that surrounds you. Therefore it’s an amazing place to practice trad climbing. (On a technical note you are alright without cams, but bring with you hexes and more than one set of nuts)

The places listed above are the ones I had the pleasure of climbing during the last year and a half since I started climbing outdoors, but there are a lot of places I need to discover yet: Scotland, Ireland, Cornwall, Exeter, etc…

As you already noticed in the UK most of the climbing is traditional, but there is an option for everybody in every occasion.

If you are looking for an alternative holiday and you want to try climbing and living a vertical experience, Great Britain is the place for you with the massive presence of climbing courses for beginners. The ones I feel to recommend to check are the Plas Y Brenin BMC Courses, in Wales (here!).

God save the Queen 😉

*Almost all the pictures of this blog post have been taken by my lovely and talented friend Tamsin. If you want to have a look at her portfolio click here!!!

a3601-1gwb0y5rd8buyufq_tvhvfg

12232916_10156218330960099_7930974065649493654_o

Sunset after climbing in Peak District, November 2015

Quando incontro climbers di altri Paesi, c’é una frase ricorrente che viene pronunciata con una smorfia di compassione nei miei confronti: “Oh vivi in Inghilterra…non c’é molto da arrampicare là, vero?”

Mi sento perció chiamata in causa per spezzare una lancia in favore di questa terra cosí poco conosciuta, anche perchè è proprio a lei che devo il fiorire della mia passione per questo sport!

11792089_10155880526200099_8691263917511847058_o

Wye Valley, August 2015

Nonostante non ci siano le Alpi, la Sierra Nevada o il Grand Canyon, la Gran Bretagna offre una vasta selezione di rocce da arrampicare, dal bouldering al trad climbing, arrivando addirittura all’ice climbing nei freddi inverni scozzesi.

Ora voi ribatterete “Si peró il tempo fa schifo, piove sempre! Quindi non si riesce mai ad andare…” ed é qui che vi sbagliate. É vero che il tempo é variabile e che potrebbe piovere da un giorno all’altro, ma se si impara la tecnica il gioco é fatto: Metoffice e la BBC saranno i vostri migliori amici durante la settimana precedente il viaggio ed é il meteo del Giovedì pomeriggio quello da considerare affidabile. Fortunatamente molti ostelli vicino ai maggiori punti di arrampicata si rendono conto della necessità di seguire le condizioni meteo e permettono di cancellare o cambiare prenotazione fino al giorno precedente.

11201121_10205659451662345_1745409141795908946_o

Me and Anna in Wales, April 2015

Se viaggiate da fuori e prendete l’aereo, a quel punto diventa difficile cambiare programmi all’ultimo minuto… Soluzione: scegliete il Galles. Nella valle attorno a Llanberris il tempo puó cambiare da una sponda all’altra del fiume/Lago, perció se piove da un lato vi basterà spostarvi dall’altro per trovare condizioni adatte ad arrampicare. So che sembra pazzesco ed impossibile ma, credetemi, l’ho visto succedere con i miei stessi occhi!!!

10391383_10203895317080083_4980942015203819072_n

Trad Climbing in Peak District, July 2014

L’anno scorso io e la crew abbiamo iniziato a viaggiare verso metà Febbraio (consigliato solo a chi sa sopportare bene il freddo!!!) e ci siamo fermati solo a fine Ottobre. Mai avuto grossi problemi, anzi siamo stati molto fortunati ed il 3 Aprile in Galles c’era un sole pazzesco e si arrampicava a maniche corte…

Se poi avete scelto il Galles e diluvia da tutte le parti la soluzione migliore é quella di intraprendere l’avventura chiamata Snakes and Ladders (a cui dedicheró un post a parte! N.B.), che vi porterà nel cuore di una antica miniera di ardesia.

Anticipato tutto ciò, ho voluto creare una piccola lista dei posti che ho visitato in Inghilterra e che sono convinta valga la pena vedere ed arrampicarvisi almeno una volta nella vita!

– Peak District.

12238128_10156216900685099_989868135305130108_o

Bouldering in Peak District, November 2015

Arenaria dura. Trad Climbing, Bouldering. (Presente un pò di sport climbing ma non troppo)

Il paradiso per trad climbers e boulderers. Ci sono numerosi punti di arrampicata, le vie non sono lunghissime (corda da 40/50 metri) ed é un buon posto per esercitarsi con il trad climbing…Ma non dimenticatevi le cams!!!

Arrampicare qui puó essere alquanto spaventoso (parlo per esperienza diretta e quella di molti altri climbers piú esperti) ma senza dubbio aiuta nell’esercizio di controllare la propria mente durante attacchi di panico 😉

Peak District é anche uno dei posti piú famosi per il bouldering ed é attrazione per moltissimi climbers professionisti ogni weekend (anche con la neve!). D’estate é pieno di moscerini, quindi sconsigliabile se non c’è vento (anche qui esperienza personale)! Macchina consigliata.

– Lake District, Keswick.

11069925_10205328217101688_5058437316662609565_n

The Bowderstone

Roccia vulcanica. Trad climbing, bouldering.

Meravigliosa ambientazione, in paesini da fiaba lungo i laghi. Le vie sono per lo piú per trad climbing e sono quasi tutte multipitch, quindi serve esperienza nel preparare le soste. Io suggerisco una corda da 50/60 metri.

Un pò meno diffuso ma comunque piacevole é il bouldering nella zona… Se volete comunque darvi al bouldering dovete assolutamente visitare Bowderstone a Keswick. Chiedete a qualunque climbers trovate e loro sapranno dove dirigervi. Meglio spostarsi in macchina ma ci sono numerosi bus. State attenti all’ultima corsa serale!

– Harrison’s Rock, Tunbridge Wells, Kent.

10636907_10155440190740099_1312899950093121920_o.jpg

Top Rope in Harrison’s Rock, March 2015

Arenaria morbida. Top Rope (Mulinette?) e bouldering.

A solo un’ora di treno da Londra é un buon posto per allenarsi in quanto la roccia morbida richiede forza e tecnica… Dimenticatevi di prese buone per le mani!!!

Le vie sono molto corte, una corda da 30m puó bastare ma bisogna portare attrezzatura extra per settare la top rope in cima: essendo la roccia molto sensibile é necessario usare una corda statica per il punto di ancoraggio e fare in modo che il moschettone attraverso il quale sarà fatta passare la corda dinamica per arrampicare non tocchi la parete, per evitare frizione e rovinare la roccia. Siate extra coscienziosi!!!

Extra tip: la roccia asciuga molto lentamente essendo porosa quindi per poter arrampicare bene bisogna che non piova per almeno 3 giorni di fila. Si raggiunge Eridge in treno (hanno le toilet più belle di sempre!!!Andate a vederle, sono sulla piattaforma opposta a quella di arrivo!) e poi si cammina per 20 minuti.

– Snowdonia, Galles.

11187183_10205659432741872_2320209271400871726_o.jpg

The view after a multipitch in Wales in April 2015

Ci sono ben 8 tipi di roccia diversi, tutti a circa 20/30 minuti l’uno dall’altro. Bouldering, trad climbing, sport climbing.

Come già accennato il tempo é molto variabile, permettendo di trovare punti per scalare anche se il tempo non é delle migliori condizioni. É un posto molto buono per iniziare con trad climbing e mountaineering. Io ed Anna abbiamo avuto modo di scalare per la prima volta una via lunga (150metri!!!) e di praticare la preparazione delle soste (ovviamente sotto supervisione di un esperto). Corda da 50/60 metri.

Fuori dal comune ma importantissima attrazione in Galles é la miniera di ardesia che ho precedentemente citato. Roccia tagliente per le scarpette (Ho dovuto dire addio alle mie Katana… Sigh 😦 ), é solo sport climbing ed é spettacolare da scalare. Macchina necessaria.

– Swanage, Portland.

10568786_292950680913645_3525489795245112186_n

Sport climbing in Swanage, August 2014

Calcare. Sport Climbing.

Meta di climbers londinesi da metà Aprile a fine Agosto, si trova sul mare ed offre una vastissima selezione di vie di sport climbing. La roccia, essendo sul mare, si consuma facilmente e le vie di grado piú facile sono molto scivolose in quanto le prese sono talmente levigate da essere lucide! Per questo il consiglio è di non farsi spaventare o demoralizzare ma provare ad arrampicare qualcosa di grado più alto, che sarà sicuramente meno scivoloso. Necessario spostarsi in macchina. Corda da 50 metri.

– Cheddar Gorge.

11077_10205232592871142_4740912968793394073_n.jpg

Coronation Street. Cheddar Gorge, March 2015

Calcare. Sport Climbing, Tradizionale.

Cheddar Gorge è stato il posto della mia prima esperienza di leading in sport climbing!!! Corda da 50/60 metri.

Anche qui una vasta selezione di vie per sport climbing, ma ci sono anche vie per trad. Ce ne é una in particolare molto famosa, il sogno di ogni trad climbers: Coronation Street.

Le pareti di arrampicata si snodano lungo la strada e la scalata é proibita in certi momenti dell’anno. Prima di organizzare il viaggio controllate qui! Se decidete di recarvi a Cheddar Gorge andateci con una assicurazione che copra l’arrampicata oppure rischiate una multa. Oh, ed assaggiate il Cheddar!!! Macchina Necessaria.

– Wye Valley.

vale (2)

Vertigo. Wye Valley, August 2014

Calcare. Trad Climbing.

Ecco, questo sarà il posto a cui saró legata per tutta la vita in quanto per la prima volta ho arrampicato da leader una via di tradizionale. E subito dopo la mia prima via di grado S: Vertigo.

Il posto è meraviglioso, la roccia assolutamente fantastica (anche se in alcuni punti, nelle vie piú popolari é levigata) e lo scorrere del fiume altamente rilassante. Ci sono vie per principianti dove si puó imparare a preparare punti di sosta con tranquillità e senza panico. Corda da 50/60 metri.

Alcune vie sono facili ma spettacolari e giunti in cima ci si sente ripagati dal solo panorama che ci circonda. Quindi ottimo per iniziare a praticare tradizionale. (Anche senza cams si arrampica bene lo stesso, portate peró hexes e piú di un set di nuts.)

Quelli elencati qui sopra sono i posti in cui ho avuto il piacere di arrampicare nel corso dell’anno e mezzo passato, da quando ho iniziato ad arrampicare all’aperto, ma ci sono ancora tantissimi altri posti che devo esplorare: Scozia, Irlanda, Cornovaglia, Exeter…

In UK come avrete capito la maggior parte del climbing praticato é tradizionale, ma ci sono dei posti che vale la pena visitare anche se non siete appassionati di trad.

Se cercate una vacanza alternativa e volete provare ad arrampicare e a vivere una esperienza in verticale, la Gran Bretagna fa al caso vostro, vantando il possesso di numerosi corsi validissimi per insegnare ai principianti. Quelli che mi sento di raccomandare sono i corsi BMC tenuti a Plas Y Brenin, in Galles (qui!)

*Quasi tutte le foto presenti in questo blog post sono state scattate dalla mia adorata e talentuosa amica Tamsin. Se siete curiosi di scoprire altre sue meravigliose foto cliccate qui!!!

Back to the top!

This entry was posted in Climbing / Arrampicata, Travels / Viaggi and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to You are the Rock that I want…

  1. steve says:

    That opening line cracked me up: ‘together with a look of compassion’.

    The weather is indeed variable. I’ve climbed in shorts and vest on Boxing day one year at Swanage. A sun trap, and it really was that warm!

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s